The Democratic Party slogan for the 2018 midterm elections – in which we must wrest control of the House from the GOP and take the fight against nihilistic Republican politicians to the next level – includes “Better Wages.” But the milquetoast Democratic proposal for the minimum wage is grossly inadequate.

Real wages have not kept up with worker output. Not even close. That’s why when I think about the Democrats’ new slogan, I think about Better Democrats.

I’m running against Democratic Nancy Pelosi in San Francisco because she does not represent the people, but rather a corrupt system that’s robbing us blind.

 

 

 

These are FDR Democrat policies:

  • The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation;
  • The right of every family to a decent home.

Neither of these is possible in San Francisco where the median family home costs $1.5 million and even one bedroom rent costs $3,500 per month. And Pelosi and the incumbent Democrats talk about a $15 minimum wage by 2024! It’s not enough!

I will fight for an immediate $15 federal minimum wage, indexed to cost of living where it’s earned. I will also expand Section 8 funding so that more San Francisco workers can live here. And my CEO and executive pay cap proposal (top workers compensated no more than 30x entry level and service workers) will help all workers share in corporate success.

My opponent has a staff of campaign and office workers who can make her sound good on the stump. But for 30 years, she’s refused to debate her electoral challengers, and her rampant corporate fundraising tells a different story than her glib words. I am ready, willing and able to debate Rep. Pelosi. Time will tell whether she has the courage of her convictions to face me and discuss the issues affecting San Francisco and the nation.

Rep. Pelosi is known for being the top fundraiser in the Democratic Party but she had the gall to speak out against big money at her recent appearance before the California Democratic Party:

Rep. Pelosi gives a convincing speech, but her actions are contrary to her words. She refuses to cosponsor HR 676, John Conyers’ pending single-payer bill in the House.  Her Congress cut the public option (which she praises when she doesn’t have control of the House) from Obamacare. Her new “Better Deal” proposals include negotiated drug prices but she sat on her hands throughout Big Pharma’s successful efforts beat the Bernie Sanders-backed Prop. 61 in California, which would have allowed California agencies to negotiate drug prices like the VA does.